Documenting the Wizer Block’s transformation

Published on the Lake Oswego Review website 10/29/2015

With deconstruction and demolition now underway, The Review is partnering with Lake Oswego photographer Clifford Paguio to produce a visual record of the Wizer Block’s transformation from 1950s-era shopping center to a mixed-use development with homes, offices and shops.

Paguio took these images today, and he’ll return to the site once a month to record the project’s progress in still photos and on video. Watch for them here, on Facebook and in the pages of The Review.

What’s happening on the Wizer Block

Demolition and erosion-control permits were issued for Block 137 on Oct. 21, and vibration monitors were installed. Also this week:

— Smaller pieces of demolition equipment started arriving last week in preparation for removal of the existing parking structure. Crews are stripping asphalt away from the concrete parking lot, which will make it easier to crush and recycle the concrete.

— A traffic-control plan has been implemented on Second Street and will remain in place throughout construction.

— Representatives from Lease Crutcher Lewis, the general contractor, planned to visit adjacent property owners this week to discuss upcoming work and potential impacts. Larger, 50-ton demolition equipment, which will be used to remove the Wizer’s building, was scheduled to be brought to the site.

— Drilling for steel auger piles — for the shoring and soil-retention systems — is scheduled to start around Nov. 5.

 

CLIFFORD PAGUIO/FOR THE REVIEW - Oct. 28, 2015: Looking north and west from the corner of First Street and Evergreen Road.

CLIFFORD PAGUIO/FOR THE REVIEW – Oct. 28, 2015: Looking north and west from the corner of First Street and Evergreen Road.

CLIFFORD PAGUIO/FOR THE REVIEW - Oct. 28, 2015: Looking east from Second Avenue.

CLIFFORD PAGUIO/FOR THE REVIEW – Oct. 28, 2015: Looking east from Second Avenue.

CLIFFORD PAGUIO/FOR THE REVIEW - Oct. 28, 2015: Looking straight down on the Wizer Block, where crews are stripping asphalt away from the concrete parking lot, making it easier to crush and recycle the concrete.

CLIFFORD PAGUIO/FOR THE REVIEW – Oct. 28, 2015: Looking straight down on the Wizer Block, where crews are stripping asphalt away from the concrete parking lot, making it easier to crush and recycle the concrete.